Colorado Wine Country

 

imageI thought it was time to dedicate a post to Colorado wine country.  Especially since the 26th Annual Colorado Mountain Winfest is this weekend in Palisade, Colorado.  The Winefest is Colorado’s largest wine festival featuring unlimited sips from over 50, yes 50, Colorado wineries.  The festival is held in September, perfectly planned with the changing of the seasons.

imageGrowing up in Northern California I was well aware of wineries.  After all, when you hear Napa, the first thing that comes to mind is wine.  But, in my humble opinion, Colorado has a lot to brag about as well.  I remember the first time I discovered Colorado wine country.  We were living in Denver at the time and I had to go to the Western Slope for business.  While driving along I-70, I was passing Palisade and I did a double take.  I couldn’t believe my eyes.  All of the vineyards!  It was an amazing sight.  Unfortunately, on that business trip I couldn’t partake in any vino tasting, but I made sure to tell my husband, “we must visit the Western Slope and check out the wineries!”  Well, we did!!!  We took a little mini vacation and explored the wineries.  It was an awesome experience.  Lots of very nice, hospitable folks, and of course delicious wine.  Another plus, almost every winery is dog friendly.  We were so impressed by the landscape, the wine, and of course the people, it was a great visit.

 

Mount Garfield (my favorite), the Bookcliffs, the Grand Mesa (largest flat top mountain in the world), and the Colorado River adorn the landscape, along with lavender farms, and a variety of orchards including the infamous Palisade peaches.  The Grand Valley is full of lush farmland.  A sweet combination of warm days followed by cool evenings make this valley the perfect place to grow grapes and other produce.

imageWine country in Colorado offers a wide range of wines.  If you like wine, you are covered.  White, red, rose, sweet, honey, you get the idea.  If you aren’t a wine person, no worries, there is also a brewery and distillery in Palisade as well.

imageOne item on our to do list is to cruise around the wineries on bikes.  Now is the perfect time to bike the Fruit and Wine Byway because the temperatures are starting to cool down.  Bring your own bike or rent one locally.  There are plenty of places to spend the weekend.  Including the Wine Country Inn, which can be seen off of I-70.

imageNow that we live on the Western Slope and about 15ish minutes from Colorado wine country, I want to sing its praises!  We regularly take little drives through Palisade, (that is where I took the pictures for this post) where I chase the setting sun to get dreamy pictures of that perfect light hitting the wineries.  I am always in awe of the majestic beauty out on the Western Slope.  If you haven’t made a trip out this way, I invite you to visit what I enthusiastically call home.  Raise a glass to a hidden treasure on the Western Slope, Colorado Wine Country!  Cheers!

For more information about Colorado wine country, please visit:

coloradowinefest.com

Visitgrandjunction.com

colorado.com

coloradowine.com

Visitpalisade.com

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Peach Picking in Palisade, Colorado

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Iis Palisade peach season.  Probably the best peaches I have ever sunk my teeth into.  Super juicy, fragrant, and simply delicious.  If you haven’t had the pleasure of enjoying a Palisade peach, let me give you the low down on theses delectable treasures.  The Grand Valley, where the peaches are grown, has hot days and cool nights which are a perfect combination for bringing out the natural sugars in the peaches and growing big fruit.  I grew up eating peaches in California, and no offense to California but the peaches were always very dry, mealy, and tart.  They were picked too early for transport and were not given enough time to develop enough natural sugar (thanks visitgj for this information).  So, you can imagine my amazement and pure joy when I bit into a chin-dripping Palisade peach for the first time.  Yummy!  image

There are two types of Palisade peaches, cling and freestone.  Both terms refer to the way the peach sticks to the pit.  Cling peaches stick to the pit and freestone peaches don’t.  I like both but prefer freestone peaches when cooking.  They are just easier to cut into when making cobblers or adding them to my overnight oats.

imageWe usually buy our peaches at the local Farmers Markets or we take the short drive to Palisade and buy them at the various orchards.

Recently, we decided to pick our own peaches.  We randomly stopped at Mt. Lincoln Peach Co.  We went later in the day and on a weekday so it was quiet, which I love.  When we arrived we received a box for gathering the peaches, we were also given a map showing which trees were ready for peach picking, and we were on our way.  It was a fun experience.  The orchards are green and lush with tons of ripe peaches that are extremely fragrant.  While picking peaches, a perfect view of Mt. Garfield, the Bookcliffs, and the Grand Mesa can be seen in the distance.  Helpful tip:  wear closed toe shoes, preferably tennis shoes.  The orchards were a little muddy and I was wearing a pair of dressy flats, not a good idea!image

A city girl, it was really neat seeing chickens and roosters nearby making the whole experience “a little country.”  I loved it.  imageThe pick your own peaches at this location were $1.00 a pound.  We ended up buying $8.51 (to be exact) worth of peaches.  We went home and I immediately made peach cobbler.  So good!

 

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There are many orchards and “you pick” orchards in Palisade, please visit– visitpalisade.com for more information.

If you haven’t had a Palisade peach yet, don’t worry, Palisade peach season usually runs until September.  Also, you can celebrate Palisade peaches at the annual Palisade Peach Festival, August 17-20, 2017.  For more festival information please visit–palisadepeachfest.com

Check out–“Selecting the Perfect Palisade Peaches,” at visitgrandjunction.com

Please leave a comment letting me know your thoughts on Palisade peaches.

Home ownership in Colorado–Western Slope Style!

20170618_204556-01-01_resizedWe bought a house in Grand Junction, Colorado, aka the Western Slope.  We now have an investment and we are no longer paying exuberant rent.  We feel blessed.  Everyday we get to see the beautiful, confident, underrated Mt. Garfield outside our bedroom window!  However, with all of our blessings we have quite a few homeowner lessons that we are learning along the way.  First, let me point out that I am a very organized person.  I still keep an old school check register because I have to highlight and mark off transactions and pending transactions.  I like to know what our monthly bills are, to the decimal point.  So with all of this border line OCD happening in my head, home ownership has had many unexpected costs.  I would like to share these costs because in my mind, well, this information is just really helpful.

First, we belong to an HOA.  No biggie.  We knew our neighborhood had an HOA prior to signing our final paperwork.  What we didn’t realize, our annual dues are due in January.  We bought our house mid-December.  The added cost of the HOA dues really put a wrench in our month, which by the way, includes Christmas and gift buying!  So, I made some phone calls and emailed the HOA and thank goodness, they allowed us to pay the dues in installments.  So, now we know that we need to have an extra $300 in checking to pay our annual HOA dues which are due in January.

Second, speaking of HOA, in our neighborhood we have irrigation water.  Now, I am not that well-versed on the whole irrigation water set up.  But what I do know, irrigation water is handy because it allows us to water our lawn and not use the same water that we use inside the house for cooking, drinking, and cleaning.  Irrigation water maintenance is very specific.  Apparently, before winter the irrigation system must be “blown out” so that the pipes don’t freeze.  We didn’t have to do that this year because the previous homeowner took care of it.  In the spring, you have to make sure, before they turn on the irrigation pump that the valve on your property is closed and then once they turn on the pump you can turn on the valve.  Confusing right???  Well in all of that confusion we also got a bill for $60 from the ditch and drainage company.  This annual bill is due in March.  So, I had to make another call and find out what the bill was for and if I could pay it a little late.  So, now we know that we have to pay an extra $60 for irrigation water in March.

Third, we got another bill related to the irrigation due in June.  This bill is paid to the drainage district and is the storm water utility fee.  This fee of $36 is an annual bill for the runoff from the irrigation water.

Fourth, the power companies (electric and gas), water, sewage, garbage, and cable all have to be set up.  Theses utilities also include an initial connection fee.  I know this seems like a no brainer, but we were renting and didn’t pay for water, sewage, or garbage.  Also, our power bill was one bill when we rented and now it is two separate bills from two separate companies.  Cable, I know it is not a necessity, but we do set it up, especially for the Internet (how would I write this compelling blog post 🙂

Fifth, we rekeyed the house, completely necessary.  We had  to buy an extra garage remote, because the previous homeowner only left one.  Also, we needed a washer and dryer.  We could have sworn that the washer and dryer were being left behind in our contract but we reread it, and were sadly mistaken.  Thank goodness for Craigslist.  We also needed a lawn mower, edger, and a hose, which we didn’t have to buy right away because it was winter when we moved in.

Home ownership is teaching us a lot.  We have other expenses but they are not necessities.  For example, we have changed out the old light fixtures for more energy efficient lighting.  This was not necessary, but we are slowly putting our own touches on our house along with trying to find ways to cut costs like the electricity bill!

In conclusion, home ownership is blissful and stressful!  We own our very own home.  We can paint, change lighting, pull up carpet, and basically make it our own.  This is what makes buying a house turn into a home.  But, the most spectacular part of home ownership is that we get to visit places in western Colorado that we have never visited before.  We are off exploring every weekend and we are enjoying our adventures!

 

**If you have any home ownership tips to share, please put them in the comment section.  I love to hear different perspectives and advice.

 

Our New Home, the Western Slope!

It has been a while since my last post.  I have no excuses.  But I will admit, I am addicted to Instagram.  That is where I have been keeping up with lovelivingincolorado social media.  Since my last post, we moved from Denver (where we lived for 5 1/2 years), which is also known as the Front Range to Grand Junction, which is known as the Western Slope.  We have always enjoyed visiting the Western Slope.  When the opportunity popped up for us to relocate to the Western Slope we jumped on the chance to relocate.  Some may read this and think, “why would you ever leave Denver?”  I had a hard time at first, thinking about moving away from the city, but then I remembered all of the reasons I truly love the Western Slope.  Below are some reasons, if you have any you think I should add, please let me know!

  1.  Affordability.  We were finally able to buy our first house.  While we loved living in a little over 800 square feet for 5 1/2 years in Denver, having a home with over 1600 square feet, more than one bathroom, a 2 car garage, a backyard for our pup, as well as absolutely NO shared walls, well, we feel spoiled!  Did I mention no more shoveling out our cars????
  2. We are about 20 minutes from wine country.  Yes, that is correct.  Colorado wine country, also known as Palisade, Colorado is a little piece of Heaven!  Visiting the wineries via bike, a must!
  3. The Colorado National Monument is literally minutes from our house and the views never tire.
  4. Many, many trails to hike.
  5. Close proximity to skiing at Powderhorn as well access to the Grand Mesa (largest flat top mountain in the world).  No more fighting the crowds on I-70 trying to get, well anywhere to ski.  We are on the other side of Vail Pass and we don’t have to travel through the Eisenhower Tunnel.
  6. We are about an hour and 45 minutes from Moab, Utah, which is home to not one but two National Parks.
  7. Telluride is about 2 1/2 hours away, Aspen 2 hours and 13 minutes, Crested Butte 3 hours, Durango 3 1/2 hours, and Glenwood Springs now only takes us 1 hour and 21 minutes.
  8. Have you heard of Palisade peaches?  Yum!
  9. Love the outdoors?  The western part of the state is for you!
  10. The landscape, Mount Garfield and the Bookcliffs are absolutely stunning!

Colorado is wonderful for many reasons.  As much as I miss Denver, it is exciting to experience another part of this wonderful state!  If you need any Western Slope recommendations, please leave a comment below.  The West Slope is the Best Slope!  Thanks for reading!