Peach Picking in Palisade, Colorado

image

Iis Palisade peach season.  Probably the best peaches I have ever sunk my teeth into.  Super juicy, fragrant, and simply delicious.  If you haven’t had the pleasure of enjoying a Palisade peach, let me give you the low down on theses delectable treasures.  The Grand Valley, where the peaches are grown, has hot days and cool nights which are a perfect combination for bringing out the natural sugars in the peaches and growing big fruit.  I grew up eating peaches in California, and no offense to California but the peaches were always very dry, mealy, and tart.  They were picked too early for transport and were not given enough time to develop enough natural sugar (thanks visitgj for this information).  So, you can imagine my amazement and pure joy when I bit into a chin-dripping Palisade peach for the first time.  Yummy!  image

There are two types of Palisade peaches, cling and freestone.  Both terms refer to the way the peach sticks to the pit.  Cling peaches stick to the pit and freestone peaches don’t.  I like both but prefer freestone peaches when cooking.  They are just easier to cut into when making cobblers or adding them to my overnight oats.

imageWe usually buy our peaches at the local Farmers Markets or we take the short drive to Palisade and buy them at the various orchards.

Recently, we decided to pick our own peaches.  We randomly stopped at Mt. Lincoln Peach Co.  We went later in the day and on a weekday so it was quiet, which I love.  When we arrived we received a box for gathering the peaches, we were also given a map showing which trees were ready for peach picking, and we were on our way.  It was a fun experience.  The orchards are green and lush with tons of ripe peaches that are extremely fragrant.  While picking peaches, a perfect view of Mt. Garfield, the Bookcliffs, and the Grand Mesa can be seen in the distance.  Helpful tip:  wear closed toe shoes, preferably tennis shoes.  The orchards were a little muddy and I was wearing a pair of dressy flats, not a good idea!image

A city girl, it was really neat seeing chickens and roosters nearby making the whole experience “a little country.”  I loved it.  imageThe pick your own peaches at this location were $1.00 a pound.  We ended up buying $8.51 (to be exact) worth of peaches.  We went home and I immediately made peach cobbler.  So good!

 

image

There are many orchards and “you pick” orchards in Palisade, please visit– visitpalisade.com for more information.

If you haven’t had a Palisade peach yet, don’t worry, Palisade peach season usually runs until September.  Also, you can celebrate Palisade peaches at the annual Palisade Peach Festival, August 17-20, 2017.  For more festival information please visit–palisadepeachfest.com

Check out–“Selecting the Perfect Palisade Peaches,” at visitgrandjunction.com

Please leave a comment letting me know your thoughts on Palisade peaches.

Welcome to Colorful Colorado!

cropped-rsz_2dsc_0138.jpg“Welcome to Colorful Colorado,” the phrase that greets people at the state line.  This phrase is a welcoming  beacon after a long day of travel.  It greets visitors and residents in the same manner, with open arms and opportunity.  When you see those 4 words you know that you have arrived at your destination.  These words, almost as soothing as “I love you.”  Ok, I know that may be pushing it a little, but in reality if you are traveling and Colorado is your destination, sometimes it feels that way.  Depending on what direction you are traveling, that sign may be a sign of relief.  **Did you know–Colorado has 7 border states–Wyoming, Utah, Arizona (part of the infamous 4 Corners region), New Mexico, Oklahoma, Nebraska, and Kansas.

We travel a lot around the United States and in all honesty, I am not being biased, the Colorado welcome sign is, well, the best.  It has pizazz!  Ok, I am biased.  I just love to see the welcome sign.  It means I am home.  This particular sign does represent home.  It is along the Colorado/Utah border on I-70.  It is my favorite picture.  I took it during our home search in Grand Junction.  Screenshot_2017-06-22-13-40-10-1-01

The sign, which is deep-rooted with Colorado residents, almost had a face-lift.  When I was trying to find some information or history in reference to the sign I read that there was talk years ago about changing the font.  But, Colorado folks were not having that!  I have also read that some feel the sign is monotone and drab.  I mean how can you have the word colorful in a drab wooden, two tone sign?  I think it is perspective.  What makes Colorado colorful?  Colorado is not only mountains.  Prairies, farmland, deserts, mesas, canyons, valleys, monuments, all adorn the Colorado landscape as well.  All of these different types of topographic treasures make Colorado colorful!  It just depends on your outlook.

(The welcome sign on the Colorado/Wyoming border) Screenshot_2017-06-22-13-53-01-1-01

I am still a self proclaimed tourist in my own state.  I am the one you will see on the side of the road (safely) snapping a picture of the “Welcome to Colorful Colorado” sign.  I find it to be somewhat of a treasure hunt to find all of the different signs welcoming folks to the great state of Colorado.  One sign in particular had me on a quest.  I first saw the sign on Instagram.  It truly was the only “Welcome to Colorful Colorado” sign that was, well, colorful.  I had to find it.  I was on a mission.  And I was bringing my husband and our pup along for the ride.  It took some time but I managed, thanks to the Instagram community, to pinpoint the location.  20170429_161848-01_resized

See!  It truly is colorful.  This sign is located on the Colorado(Hwy 90)/Utah(Hwy 46) border.  The nice thing about the location of this sign, it has a turnout for safely taking pictures.  Now, I should state that not all signs along the border welcoming folks into Colorado are exciting!  But they are worth mentioning.  One honorable mention is the Colorado state line sign in Dinosaur National Monument.  Not an exciting sign, but it is neat to know that while in the park you are traveling between two different states. 20170603_150921-01-01_resized

You might be thinking, how in the world can she devote a blog post to a welcome sign?  My response, it is a Colorado thing.  We even have signs to let you know when you are leaving…..Screenshot_2017-06-22-14-03-30-1-01

As always, please share your thoughts in the comment section.  You can also follow me on Instagram, where I spend most of my time!:)

Home ownership in Colorado–Western Slope Style!

20170618_204556-01-01_resizedWe bought a house in Grand Junction, Colorado, aka the Western Slope.  We now have an investment and we are no longer paying exuberant rent.  We feel blessed.  Everyday we get to see the beautiful, confident, underrated Mt. Garfield outside our bedroom window!  However, with all of our blessings we have quite a few homeowner lessons that we are learning along the way.  First, let me point out that I am a very organized person.  I still keep an old school check register because I have to highlight and mark off transactions and pending transactions.  I like to know what our monthly bills are, to the decimal point.  So with all of this border line OCD happening in my head, home ownership has had many unexpected costs.  I would like to share these costs because in my mind, well, this information is just really helpful.

First, we belong to an HOA.  No biggie.  We knew our neighborhood had an HOA prior to signing our final paperwork.  What we didn’t realize, our annual dues are due in January.  We bought our house mid-December.  The added cost of the HOA dues really put a wrench in our month, which by the way, includes Christmas and gift buying!  So, I made some phone calls and emailed the HOA and thank goodness, they allowed us to pay the dues in installments.  So, now we know that we need to have an extra $300 in checking to pay our annual HOA dues which are due in January.

Second, speaking of HOA, in our neighborhood we have irrigation water.  Now, I am not that well-versed on the whole irrigation water set up.  But what I do know, irrigation water is handy because it allows us to water our lawn and not use the same water that we use inside the house for cooking, drinking, and cleaning.  Irrigation water maintenance is very specific.  Apparently, before winter the irrigation system must be “blown out” so that the pipes don’t freeze.  We didn’t have to do that this year because the previous homeowner took care of it.  In the spring, you have to make sure, before they turn on the irrigation pump that the valve on your property is closed and then once they turn on the pump you can turn on the valve.  Confusing right???  Well in all of that confusion we also got a bill for $60 from the ditch and drainage company.  This annual bill is due in March.  So, I had to make another call and find out what the bill was for and if I could pay it a little late.  So, now we know that we have to pay an extra $60 for irrigation water in March.

Third, we got another bill related to the irrigation due in June.  This bill is paid to the drainage district and is the storm water utility fee.  This fee of $36 is an annual bill for the runoff from the irrigation water.

Fourth, the power companies (electric and gas), water, sewage, garbage, and cable all have to be set up.  Theses utilities also include an initial connection fee.  I know this seems like a no brainer, but we were renting and didn’t pay for water, sewage, or garbage.  Also, our power bill was one bill when we rented and now it is two separate bills from two separate companies.  Cable, I know it is not a necessity, but we do set it up, especially for the Internet (how would I write this compelling blog post 🙂

Fifth, we rekeyed the house, completely necessary.  We had  to buy an extra garage remote, because the previous homeowner only left one.  Also, we needed a washer and dryer.  We could have sworn that the washer and dryer were being left behind in our contract but we reread it, and were sadly mistaken.  Thank goodness for Craigslist.  We also needed a lawn mower, edger, and a hose, which we didn’t have to buy right away because it was winter when we moved in.

Home ownership is teaching us a lot.  We have other expenses but they are not necessities.  For example, we have changed out the old light fixtures for more energy efficient lighting.  This was not necessary, but we are slowly putting our own touches on our house along with trying to find ways to cut costs like the electricity bill!

In conclusion, home ownership is blissful and stressful!  We own our very own home.  We can paint, change lighting, pull up carpet, and basically make it our own.  This is what makes buying a house turn into a home.  But, the most spectacular part of home ownership is that we get to visit places in western Colorado that we have never visited before.  We are off exploring every weekend and we are enjoying our adventures!

 

**If you have any home ownership tips to share, please put them in the comment section.  I love to hear different perspectives and advice.